Research

February 24, 2018 at 11:51 am

Six Biological Sciences Grad Students Awarded A&S Graduate Student Research Awards

Biological Sciences graduate student awardees outside Irvine Hall. from lft: Anthony Gilbert, Jasmine Croghan, Cassie Thompson, Juan Pablo Aquilar Cabezas. Waymon Holloway. Not pictured, Rachel Olsen

Biological Sciences graduate student awardees outside Irvine Hall. from lft: Anthony Gilbert, Jasmine Croghan, Cassie Thompson, Juan Pablo Aquilar Cabezas. Waymon Holloway. Not pictured, Rachel Olsen

Six Biological Sciences graduate students were chosen to receive College of Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Research Awards this past fall during the inaugural funding cycle for the award.

The objective of the research award is to support graduate students in their research endeavors. Two review cycles are offered each year, Nov. 1 and May 1.

Awards will be made to support travel to field sites to collect data, travel to and registration fees for conferences (must be presenting), supplies and materials directly associated with research, professional development opportunities (e.g., workshop to learn a new skill not available on campus), technology directly related to research (laptop or tablet), etc. Awards may not be used to fund salary (either that of your own or an assistant). Priority will be given to proposals that demonstrate a clear and compelling link between the funds and proposed research or scholarly activity.

The six Biological Sciences graduate students who won :

  • Jasmine Croghan — using CT scans to better understand turtle head anatomy and function
  • Waymon Holloway — study of the head muscle biomechanics of the extinct Phytosauria
  • Rachel Olsen — understanding complex tongue movements during feeding
  • Cassie Thompson — amphibian  (frogs) responses to climate change
  • Juan Pablo Aguilar Cabezas — study of the ecology of the big brown bat, which is being threatened by white-nose fungal disease
  • Anthony Gilbert — environmental impacts and phenotypic plasticity related to extinction-risk

 

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