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March 15, 2016 at 3:40 pm

Summer 2016 | English Offers Tier I Courses All Summer Long

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The English Department offers courses in the first, second and full summer session that fill the English Tier I general education requirement for Ohio University students.

English Tier I—First Summer Session

ENG 1510 101 Writing and Rhetoric I

Class #4746 | First Summer Session

Description: This course offers practice in composing and revising expository essays that are well-organized, logically coherent, and effective for their purpose and audience. Topics are from personal experience, nonfiction reading, and research material.

ENG 3060J Women and Writing

Class #4747, 4748 | First Summer Session

Description: This course offers practice in developing essays on women and their interests, on women and writing, and on gender issues.

ENG 3080J 100 Writing and Rhetoric II

Class #4752 | First Summer Session

Description: This junior composition course focuses on developing effective writing skills across a variety of textual genres. Students learn to rhetorically analyze social and cultural texts, create research-based arguments, work on reports, write reviews, and hone skills on technical writing. Reading materials include visual images, texts, documentaries, blogs and movies. Coursework includes reading rhetorically and learning effective strategies for searching academic databases and evaluating sources. Using correct documentation and learning the mechanics of good writing will be a primary focus of the course.

ENG 3100J 100 Writing About Environmental Sustainability

Class #4750 | First Summer Session

Description: Readings, film screenings, discussions (oral and online), research and composing are focused on relations between people and the environment, primarily but not exclusively, in our regional environment. Students explore mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia, the natural history of the region’s forests, industrial food systems and “locavore” (agri)culture. The approach is “ecological” in the sense of attempting to understand our complex interrelationships with the natural and artificial systems we rely on and of which we are a part. We take a similar approach to environmental rhetoric and use rhetorical analysis as the main means of mapping connections among informative, persuasive, and creative discourse on these topics.

ENG 2100 Critical Approaches to Popular Literature

Class #5454 | First Summer Session

Description: Encounter the world of imagination as expressed in popular literature and film. Our major thematic question is: In what ways does our culture today actively suppress our imaginative capabilities? Why might it do so? What is the risk to the status quo of a world in which our visionary abilities are allowed free reign? To what lengths might society go to keep our minds in line with the mainstream scripts?

English Tier I —Second Summer Session

ENG 1510 101 Writing and Rhetoric I

Class #4746 | Second Summer Session

Description: This course is practice in composing and revising expository essays that are well-organized, logically coherent, and effective for their purpose and audience. Topics are from personal experience, nonfiction reading, and research material.

ENG 3060J 102 Women and Writing

Class #4749 | Second Summer Session

Description: Topic: Is Feminism Dead? In this course we consider French feminist Elisabeth Badinter’s assessment of feminism since the 1990s as “dead-end feminism” and explore what feminism looks like and means for women, and men, in 2015. The course looks to a variety of media, including television, blogs, documentaries, and more in order to investigate the ways that feminism is talked about, contended with, and experienced in contemporary contexts by women across various social, cultural, and geographic locations. Students compose in a variety of genres, using writing to engage with and contribute to these conversations. Potential texts include excerpts from Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist, and Catlin Moran’s How to Be a Woman and episodes of HBO’s Girls and BBC’s The Fall.

ENG 3080J 101 Writing and Rhetoric II

Class #4753 | Second Summer Session

Description: This course uses film and literature to explore the nature of our 21st century reality, focused on major events of the last 15 years (9/11, Iraq, Katrina, Great Recession), as well looking at alternate visions of the future. Films include Memento, The Woman Who Wasn’t There, The Hurt Locker, Fruitvale Station, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Her, and others TBD. The reading list includes Claudia Rankine, Ben Fountain, Dave Eggers, Ta-Nahesis Coates, and Jennifer Egan. Class is held in the Film Screening room in Ellis Hall.

ENG 3100J 101 Writing About Environmental Sustainability

Class #4751 | Second Summer Session

Description: Readings, film screenings, discussions (oral and online), research and composing focus on relations between people and the environment, primarily but not exclusively, in our regional environment. The course explores mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia, the natural history of the region’s forests, industrial food systems and “locavore” (agri)culture. Our approach is “ecological” in the sense of attempting to understand our complex interrelationships with the natural and artificial systems we rely on and of which we are a part. The course takes a similar approach to environmental rhetoric and uses rhetorical analysis as the main means of mapping connections among informative, persuasive, and creative discourse on these topics.

English Tier I—Full Summer Session

ENG 3080J 104 Writing and Rhetoric II

Class #5460 | Full Summer Session

Description: The Western: Myths and Myth Breakers looks at ideologies created, deployed, and critiqued through the western, a genre of fiction and film focused on the American West. Students analyze short stories, images, and films. Writing assignments include verbal and visual analysis and a creative proposal. Students need access to two films: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (currently available for free streaming on Netflix) and Lone Star (purchase option through Amazon Instant Video).

ENG 3080J 106 Writing and Rhetoric II

Class #5462 | Full Summer Session

Description: This section focuses on the ways medical rhetoric and sexual literacy intersect, interact, and influence each other in significant ways. Additionally, it considers how health is depicted, portrayed, and understood in and beyond the medical field. Readings cover a range of topics, such as sex education; reproductive rights; HIV/AIDS; mental illness, depression, and anxiety; sexual assault; personhood and dignity; and accessible and inclusive health care. In addition to analyzing and composing traditional print texts, students also consider and create visual and multimodal texts.

ENG 3840J 100 Writing, Reading, and Rhetoric in the Professions ONLINE

Class #5463 | Full Summer Session

Description: This course examines rhetorical theory in professional writing, such as the role of context, audience, and purpose in creating documents, and ethical decision making in professional writing. Students engage in writing and reading critically, writing individually and collaboratively, and writing formally and informally.

ENG 3020 100 Topics in Shakespeare ONLINE

Class #5458 | Full Summer Session

Description: Sex and Bondage in Shakespeare’s Comedies is a study of four Shakespearean comedies: The Taming of the Shrew (1592), Much Ado about Nothing (1598), As You Like It (1599), and Twelfth Night (1601). Students analyze these plays in terms of their structure, characterization, action, language, and the like and pay special attention to the issue of sex and bondage: namely, the social containments that control and bind sexuality, such as the political and social structures that inform gender roles for females and males. The course also gives attention to the cultural reproduction of Shakespeare—Shakespeare on the page, on the stage, and on the screen.

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