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February 22, 2016 at 1:25 pm

Migration Patterns for a Family with No Country—And a Landing at OHIO

Rex and Tavi Popescu on their journey to Ohio.

Rex and Tavi Popescu on their journey to Ohio.

Editor’s Note: Welcome to Athens, Bekka, Viorel, Tavi and Rex! 

By Dr. Bekka S. Brodie
Adjunct Professor of Biological Sciences

They say that migration is most evident in birds. But I would argue that academics have a much more evident migration. Academic migrants move in their search of wisdom, experience, and adventure, all (with the hope) to secure permanent positions at an academic institution. But like bird migration, it is far more complex than expected.

My family and I have been migrating city to city—even country to country—for just over five years. We, like most migrant academics, settle in our new place for two to four years before setting off again for a new post doc or temporary academic position.

But unlike many academic migrants, we have a complicated visa situation that has made us (at least up until now) “a family with no country to call home.” This is my story of our great migrations, our final destination to Ohio University, and the end of our pedagogical practice of travel.

Rex, Bekka Brodie, Tavi, and Viorel Popescu in Maine in 2010.

Rex, Bekka Brodie, Tavi, and Viorel Popescu in Maine in 2010.

‘Family with No Country To Call Home’ Series

Our great migration started in the state of Maine and includes stays in Canada and Romania before we recently nested in Athens, OH, where my husband, Viorel Popescu, is a new Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences at Ohio University.

1.) A Family with no Country to Call Home: a modern love story

2.) Viorel’s Story: why we are a family with no country

3.) A Family with no Country to Call home: Romania Adventure!

4.) Finding a Way Back Home

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