Research

September 23, 2013 at 7:48 pm

Nature Article on Light-bending Helices Reaches 100 Citations

Ph.D. student Zhiyuan Fan and Dr. Alexander Govorov with their Nature article.

Ph.D. student Zhiyuan Fan and Dr. Alexander Govorov with their Nature article.

 

Congrats to Dr. Alexander Govorov and Ph.D. student Zhiyuan Fan on their paper in Nature accumulating 100 citations in the 18 months since its publication.

The two were co-authors on a March 2012 paper on “DNA-based self-assembly of chiral plasmonic nanostructures with tailored optical response,” which appeared in the journal Nature, the international weekly journal of science.

“This paper has accumulated 100 citations in the 18 months since its publication. The remarkable attention this work is getting places it in the top 15 percent of all papers, regardless of discipline, of a similar vintage which were published in Nature. As most of you probably remember, Fan received the Donald Clippinger Graduate Fellowship last year, and he used that fellowship to continue this research direction for his Ph.D.,” says Dr. Daniel Phillips, Professor and Graduate Chair of Physics and Astronomy.

“Since its discovery in the mid-20th century, scientists have manipulated the double-helix structure of DNA to engineer crops, build microscopic structures and trace the origins of life. In an article published by Nature in mid-March, NQPI physicist Dr. Alexander Govorov helped prove that the unique molecule could also be used to bend light in ways that do not occur naturally,” reports the lead article in the Spring 2012 Nanoscale Quantum Phenomena Institute newsletter.

“The study, conducted by Dr. Govorov and researchers from the Technische Universität München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität of Germany, utilized a five-year-old method of DNA nanostructure design called DNA origami to create microscopic helices with special properties. When placed in a particular spatial arrangement, these nanostructures made of gold nanoparticles and DNA origami can result in novel optical properties.”

“We predicted this from the beginning,” Govorov said. “This structure should rotate light amazingly strong,  10^ 6 times more efficiently than the naturally-occurring chiral biomolecules!  In this study we created a material with very unusual properties.”

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